Quiet US Hurricane Season — So Far

Four named tropical storms have developed so far during the 2016 hurricane season, but none have done major damage to US coastal cities.

On May 29, Tropical Storm Bonnie weakened to a tropical depression before making landfall near Charleston, South Carolina. Heavy rains associated with Bonnie caused local flooding and treacherous rip currents along the Southeast US coastline. One person drowned in North Carolina and another in Florida.

Tropical Storm Colin came ashore in the Big Bend area of Florida on June 7, triggering heavy rain and flash floods. 4 people drowned due to rip currents along the beaches of the Florida Panhandle.

On June 21, Tropical Storm Danielle with wind speeds of 45mph (75km/h} hit Veracruz, Mexico, closing the port and flooding areas, requiring the evacuation of 1,200 families.

Hurricane Earl struck Belize in Central America on August 4. Earl, with wind speeds of 80mph (130km/h), regenerated and hit Veracruz on August 6, where a landslide killed 3 people.

Colorado State University and NOAA both forecast an average hurricane year in 2016, made up of 12 to 15 named storms including 6 hurricanes. The two main factors leading this forecast of a near average season are the development of a weak La Niña and cooler than normal North Atlantic sea surface temperatures.

When and where the storms will make landfall is not part of the forecast. According to NOAA, historically 1 to 2 hurricanes come ashore in the US each season, although the number making US landfall has been below average for the last decade.

The hurricane season traditionally runs from June through November. However tropical storms can and have occurred in other months, some bringing heavy property damage and loss of life. As of this writing, there are still many weeks left in the 2016 hurricane season. Whether all or none of the remaining predicted storms will occur is up to Mother Nature. But just in case, those living on or near the Eastern Seaboard and Gulf Coast should be prepared.